8th grader knows his geography

Cade Wille wins Princeton’s National Geographic Geography Bee in consecutive years

Princeton Middle School geography bee winner Cade Wille shares a smile after winning the school competition on December 22, 2016. Wille will now compete in a state geography bee will the hope of advancing to nationals.
Princeton Middle School geography bee winner Cade Wille shares a smile after winning the school competition on December 22, 2016. Wille will now compete in a state geography bee will the hope of advancing to nationals.

PRINCETON – A Princeton Middle School eighth-grader has been crowned the winner of the school’s annual National Geographic geography bee.
It’s the second consecutive year that Cade Wille has won the event.
Ten students participated in the bee. The 10 were the top scorers in the geography bee’s 50-question written test given earlier to students in grades six through eight. This year’s top 10 were all boys: Cade, runner-up Max McChesney, third-place winner Ben Schreder, along with Adam Johaneson, Reiley Seifert, Alex Johnson, Beck Wogen, Angelo Vita, Peyton Spout and Jesse Roach.
The geography bee began with a series of three questions: one oral, one written and one based on a map. Three participants were eliminated after answering two of the three questions incorrectly. Only oral questions were asked the rest of the way.
Middle School Principal Dan Voce was the moderator and asked all the questions. As he told the seven remaining participants, “Questions can come from anywhere, so hold onto your seats.”
Voce wasn’t kidding. The next four questions dealt with the geography of Japan, Spain, Norway and Somalia. Four more participants fell, leaving Max, Ben and Cade to fight for a spot in the finals.
After questions about Switzerland, Portugal and Angel Falls in Venezuela, Cade took a one-question lead and advanced to the finals. Max and Ben were left to battle for another spot in the final two.
Max and Ben fielded 16 consecutive questions with incorrect answers before Max correctly answered a question about Brazil. That set up a showdown between Max and Cade for the school geography bee title.
The two students were each given three questions. They had 15 seconds to write down what they believed to be the correct answers. The participant with the most correct answers was to be crowned the school champion.
Question 1 was: Last August President Obama expanded the size of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, which is off the coast of what state? Cade correctly answered Hawaii. Max answered South Dakota to fall behind 0-1. Question 2 asked what country north of Nicaragua is the site where archeologists recently began excavating the lost city of  La Mosquitia. Neither student knew the answer. Cade got the win when Max failed to correctly answer a question about the Asian country protecting the endangered snow leopard. The correct answer was India.
Cade next has to take a 100-question written test that is given statewide to geography bee winners. The top 100 scorers in the test get to advance to the state competition on March 31. State champions will receive an all-expenses-paid trip to participate in the championship rounds May 15-17 in Washington, D.C.
The national winner will receive a $50,000 scholarship, a lifetime subscription to National Geographic magazine, a trip and $500 cash. The second-place winner receives a $25,000 scholarship and $500 cash. The third-place winner receives a $10,000 scholarship and $500 cash. The fourth- through 10th-place winners receive $500 cash each.