Meet Your Neighbor: Chelsie Skorich

austin gerth Union-Times milaca - Title I teacher Chelsie Skorich took a couple of interesting detours before finding her way to the Milaca Public School District. Becoming a teacher wasn’t what Skorich had originally planned – she started out as a theater major in college, but she found herself alienated due to her school’s theater program’s focus on musical theater. Skorich says she can’t sing well. She decided to change her course of study to education. Her mother was a paraprofessional; she had grown up with education in her family. “It was an epiphany moment for me,” she said. Education tends to be one of the more demanding and structured studies at most colleges, which can make it difficult for students in education programs to find time to study abroad. To provide herself with some type of experience abroad during college, Skorich spent part of her student teaching time in Texas and part of it in Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates, an experience she described as “40 days in the Arabian desert.” “Abu Dhabi was the cheapest program and the most exotic, in my mind,” she said. “I lived with a Muslim family and I lived right by a mosque, and those were very positive experiences for me.” She says her experience living in the Middle East differed from the way media in the United States tends to portray Middle Eastern cultures. Skorich didn’t go directly into teaching after graduation from college. Instead she spent a year and a half working in powersports marketing. Her favorite sport to watch is motocross, and she co-hosts the snowmobile-oriented series “Sledhead 24-7.” She and her boyfriend landed in Milaca after searching for a rental home with land. As a Title I teacher, Skorich works with students who are under their grade level in academic performance to help them meet state standards. She teaches reading and math to students in first through fourth grades. “I like it a lot because I get to know my kids,” she said. She works with roughly 40 students in small groups throughout the day. “I think the biggest challenge is just figuring out a rhythm, ... adjusting for all the different age levels, maturity levels,” Skorich said. Skorich said one of the most important things she’s learned since starting in her position is patience. She tries to get her students to believe in themselves. “You just have faith and confidence in them,” Skorich said. “A lot of them are aware that they aren’t at the same level of their peers.”
Chelsie Skorich

Milaca – Title I teacher Chelsie Skorich took a couple of interesting detours before finding her way to the Milaca Public School District.
Becoming a teacher wasn’t what Skorich had originally planned – she started out as a theater major in college, but she found herself alienated due to her school’s theater program’s focus on musical theater. Skorich says she can’t sing well.
She decided to change her course of study to education. Her mother was a paraprofessional; she had grown up with education in her family.
“It was an epiphany moment for me,” she said.
Education tends to be one of the more demanding and structured studies at most colleges, which can make it difficult for students in education programs to find time to study abroad. To provide herself with some type of experience abroad during college, Skorich spent part of her student teaching time in Texas and part of it in Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates, an experience she described as “40 days in the Arabian desert.”
“Abu Dhabi was the cheapest program and the most exotic, in my mind,” she said. “I lived with a Muslim family and I lived right by a mosque, and those were very positive experiences for me.”
She says her experience living in the Middle East differed from the way media in the United States tends to portray Middle Eastern cultures.
Skorich didn’t go directly into teaching after graduation from college. Instead she spent a year and a half working in powersports marketing. Her favorite sport to watch is motocross, and she co-hosts the snowmobile-oriented series “Sledhead 24-7.”
She and her boyfriend landed in Milaca after searching for a rental home with land.
As a Title I teacher, Skorich works with students who are under their grade level in academic performance to help them meet state standards. She teaches reading and math to students in first through fourth grades.
“I like it a lot because I get to know my kids,” she said. She works with roughly 40 students in small groups throughout the day.
“I think the biggest challenge is just figuring out a rhythm, … adjusting for all the different age levels, maturity levels,” Skorich said.
Skorich said one of the most important things she’s learned since starting in her position is patience. She tries to get her students to believe in themselves.
“You just have faith and confidence in them,” Skorich said. “A lot of them are aware that they aren’t at the same level of their peers.”